PFFD and Van Nes Procedure (VAN NES ROTATIONPLASTY)
Here’s a super interesting one.. PFFD is  Proximal femoral focal deficiency.  What this is a rare genetic disorder (non-hereditary) where the hip is often deformed and the legs are shorter (usually one side only). There are different extremes of the cases that can be categorized into a-d.  
In most mild cases a simple lengthening of the femoral or tibial area can fix it, along with physical therapy and different size platform shoes.  However there is a very extreme procedure called the Van nes rotationplasty that can be performed. This is also a very VERY controversial procedure. This procedure is also used for other treatments. A portion of a limb is removed, while the remaining limb below the involved portion is rotated and reattached. This procedure is used when a portion of an extremity is injured or involved with a disease, such as cancer. Typically the ankle joint becomes the knee joint. The limb is rotated because the ankle flexes in the opposite direction compared to the knee. The benefit to the patient is that they have a functioning knee joint and can run and jump.
This explains the picture, how the patient is able to position her legs like that.  What do you guys think? Is this a legitimate procedure for PFFD? 

PFFD and Van Nes Procedure (VAN NES ROTATIONPLASTY)

Here’s a super interesting one.. PFFD is  Proximal femoral focal deficiency.  What this is a rare genetic disorder (non-hereditary) where the hip is often deformed and the legs are shorter (usually one side only). There are different extremes of the cases that can be categorized into a-d.  

In most mild cases a simple lengthening of the femoral or tibial area can fix it, along with physical therapy and different size platform shoes.  However there is a very extreme procedure called the Van nes rotationplasty that can be performed. This is also a very VERY controversial procedure. This procedure is also used for other treatments. A portion of a limb is removed, while the remaining limb below the involved portion is rotated and reattached. This procedure is used when a portion of an extremity is injured or involved with a disease, such as cancerTypically the ankle joint becomes the knee joint. The limb is rotated because the ankle flexes in the opposite direction compared to the knee. The benefit to the patient is that they have a functioning knee joint and can run and jump.

This explains the picture, how the patient is able to position her legs like that.  What do you guys think? Is this a legitimate procedure for PFFD? 

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    Sth really interesting!
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    Very rare case nga talaga.
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